The VietNow National Magazine

VietNow National Magazine covers
Much more than “just another boring organizational magazine,” the VietNow National Magazine covers the issues that are important to you. Unlike most of the other “magazines” you’ll find on the Internet, the VietNow National Magazine is not just a “web-zine” that no one will ever read. This is a real magazine, printed on a very large printing press, on slick, white paper. And when you become a VietNow member, you’ll get your very own copy delivered in the U.S. mail. If you haven’t joined VietNow yet, and don’t get “the real thing,” click some of the articles below, and see a few articles from our recent issues.

Scroll down the page for lots of stories.

Looking for our writers guidelines? Click here.


Christopher Gaynor photo.
Vietnam at Shutter Speed

Fabulous photographs of the war – by Christopher Gaynor. Story by Karen St. John.

The Wall
Seven hours • forty years
At The Wall, remembering back to forty years earlier. A steady rain is falling…

Janis Nark.
Janis Nark: Army nurse
Just out of nursing school, Janis Nark joins the Army, and soon finds herself in a Medical ward, treating sick and dying soldiers just back from Vietnam. Then an Ortho ward, where she treats and comforts soldiers with all types of serious wounds. Before long she finds herself in Vietnam treating and comforting wounded U.S. soldiers.
Part 1: Janis Nark having The Right Stuff
Part 2: Janis Nark is The Right Stuff
Part 3: Janis Nark still The Right Stuff

Sgt. Alan Lee Boyer, MIA.
Sgt. Alan Lee Boyer, MIA since 1968 comes home
Alan Boyer’s mother, Dorothy Boyer, and his sister, Judi Boyer Bouchard, waited through the decades for Alan to come home.

PTSD therapies really work.
PTSD: Therapy really does help

If you’re suffering from PTSD, you don’t have to fight it alone. Therapy really does help.

Losing a brother to war - Tom Bradley
Losing a brother to war
A woman talks about what it was like when her brother was killed in the Vietnam War.

PTSD Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
I survived the Vietnam War
PTSD is an equal-opportunity demon. Not only does it do whatever it can to ruin the lives of veterans, but PTSD also can ravage a veteran’s family members. The daughter of a Vietnam veteran tells what it was like.

Draft lottery 1969.
Draft Lottery: Their faces bear their numbers
During the time of the Vietnam War, if you were a young man born between the years 1944 and 1950, and you had not already been drafted or had not joined the military by December 1, 1969, you probably were very interested in the results of the two “draft lotteries” held on that date.

VietNow National Convention
The 31st Annual VietNow National Convention
VietNow members, other interested veterans, and veteran advocates from around the country gathered for a great weekend in Crystal Lake, Illinois.

Doctor Sheldon Kushner with Loc.
A doctor’s war story
Air Force doctor Sheldon Kushner had been through a lot already, but nothing had prepared him for what happened on July 1, 1968, when a mother carried her seven-year-old son into his hospital in Vinh Long, South Vietnam, with severely mangled and infected legs.

12infantry
A few moments after
Few people will ever experience, nor should they, the immediate aftermath of close, continuous, primordial combat. If observed by a detached eye, and there never are any, the first impression is one of junk, the awful and varied detritus of a battlefield.

Vietnam veterans, they were there.
Doing what no one else would do. They were There! We were There!
Together, Vietnam veterans have a binding thread we honor that only they can know and share – the knowledge that they were part of something larger than themselves over There.

Show us your favorite POW/MIA flag
POW/MIA flags are flying all around the country, and we want to see your favorite POW/MIA flag. Hoping to keep alive the spirit of the POW/MIA flag, we feature a different POW/MIA flag (sometimes more than just one) every issue of our magazine and here on our web site. If you’ve got a camera and can write a short description of why you think it’s important to keep the POW/MIA flags flying, we’d like to hear from you. Lots of people, mostly VietNow members of course, have been sending us pictures of their favorite POW/MIA flags. Some of these flags are flying over the homes of people who care about the issue, and some of the flags fly over other places. Either way, we think it’s important to keep these black-and-white flags flying until our missing brothers are brought back home again. While lots of people want us to forget and pretend everything is OK, we will never forget. Just click to see some of our favorite POW/MIA flags, and to find out how to send us a picture of your favorite POW/MIA flag.

Chow time.
Eating in the Army: Chow time
It’s probably safe to say that soldiers have complained about their food since biblical times, and even before that. But maybe it’s not always so bad.

Vietnam War.
Agent Orange: A slow and certain death.
After his return from Vietnam, an American soldier suffered for years from problems related to his service in Vietnam. PTSD came first, followed by an early death caused by Agent Orange.

Vietnam War poetry.
Poems, thoughts, and more. No words are adequate, yet something must be said
If you’re wondering about the meaning of this headline, just think for a moment of all the things Vietnam veterans have had to deal with over the years. What we have here is a collection of some of the best poems and thoughts ever written about the Vietnam-veteran experience.

Vietnamese dolls.
Max, my doll, and me
When she was in grade school, Jeanne bifulk corresponded with an Army soldier who was in Vietnam.

POW/MIA bracelet presentation.
POW/MIA bracelet united with pilot’s family
The power of the press, a writer with an interest in military history, an old POW/MIA bracelet, the widow of an Air Force pilot, and the grandson of the pilot – all come together for an emotional meeting.

Medevac helicopter Vietnam
My medevac flight from hell
Even medevac crews like to have fun once in awhile.

Dong Ba Thin at night.
No front lines
In Vietnam there was no such thing as a safe place. The attack occurred on November 30, 1969, against the U.S. Army base at Dong Ba Thin, South Vietnam.

Khanh Ha short story.
Size-Twelve Boots
I heard a round coming over us. That long and thin mosquito-whine sound before it shattered.

Endless Love and Second Chances
Endless love and second chances
Medal of Honor wife writes inspirational memoir.

Canadian Vietnam Veterans Memorial
Canada just lost track of something
Vietnam veterans from north of the border.

Matt Davison, VietNow National Incerated Veterans chair.
Our long-time Incarcerated Veterans chairperson calls it a day
Looking back over fifteen years of helping veterans incarcerated get over the shame and loss of hope.

Tomb of the Unknown.
The Tomb of the Unknown
VietNow National President, Joe Lewis, along with National Board members Ed Banach and Steve Rucki visit the Tomb of the Unknowns in Washington, DC.

Pauline Laurent at Vietnow National Convention.
Why I write
After Pauline Laurent’s husband was killed in Vietnam, it took over twenty years until she could really begin to grieve and heal, and writing played a big role in getting better.

Warrant officer patches and insignia.
African-American warrant officers and the Vietnam War
African-American warrant officers made significant contributions and sacrifices in the Vietnam War.

Vietnam war.
Vietnam? I was there last night
How would you ever stop thinking about Vietnam?

Viet Man: A novel by D.S. Lliteras.
Book Review: Viet Man
A different kind of book about the war, by VietNow member Danny Lliteras.

U.S. nurse tends to soldier after surgery.
Military women of the Vietnam War
Women played large and important roles in the war. American female nurses saved American and Vietnamese lives, while women on the other side took lives.

Back to the World graphic.
Back to “The World”
After twenty-seven months at an isolated base in Thailand, a soldier goes home and gets out of the Army, although the trip home isn’t exactly easy.

Idealism and the western way of war
The “Western Way of War” is a term that describes various theories that have been bandied about by historians as to why Western culture has so dominated the field of battle.

Your VA claim for arthritis
It’s possible to get a service-connected disability rating if you suffer from this common condition.

Going to Vietnam: Qualifying with the M-16, civil affairs, pacification, and a prophecy
Personal reflections and stories to be told.

Is it time to take down the POW/MIA flags?
There’s a movement out there, putting forth the idea that the POW/MIA issue is over, and it’s time to take down those black-and-white flags.

VA remand letter.
VA remand letter? No rating?
Did you get a letter from the Board of Veterans Appeals? Do you know what to do about it?

Health guru faces Agent Orange ailment and VA denial
When a Vietnam veteran was turned down by the VA because his condition wasn’t on the VA’s Agent Orange presumptive list, he got some outside legal help, and ended up winning his case.

Actors for POW/MIA play, on stage.
POW: A ten-minute play

As a man and his wife prepare to mark the grim anniversary of his brother’s disappearance in Vietnam, they receive a surprising gift from a stranger – a POW bracelet.

POW/MIA remembrance ceremony.
It would be easier to be dead
Do the POWs know that they ‘are not forgotten’? Do they know that we know?

VietNow banner at The Wall That Heals.
The Wall That Heals comes to Rockford
The Rockford Charter Chapter of VietNow brings it to Rockford for all veterans and their families.

When you were in Vietnam, your brain reprogrammed itself
If you have PTSD, it’s because that program is still running in your brain.

PTSD vs. Maui Rules
Can Maui Rules make your life better?

Spraying Agent Orange with Ernest Hemingway overlay.
Hemingway, embellished stories, and Agent Orange

Recalling Vietnam for future generations.

Three questions for the young soldier within you
Asking these three questions to Vietnam veterans would get very different answers depending on when the questions were asked.

What you have is probably worse than PTSD
Post Traumatic Shame Disorder: A manual for undoing the torment of ‘Amerika’s’ Vietnam veterans.

The far far side of Vietnam War museums
Neither side has forgotten the Vietnam War. But one side has a harder time letting go. Here’s a quick look at some of Vietnam’s war memorials.

Been waiting a long time for  your VA appointment?
Time to check into the Veterans Choice program.

Mike MoomeyMy first day 
A Vietnam veteran tells what it was like on his first day in the field.

Thirty names
A Vietnam veteran tells what it was like when he read thirty names out loud at The Wall.

I don’t have PTSD. (Or do I?)
As Vietnam veterans are growing older, some are beginning to realize that the things that are bothering them might actually be PTSD.

POW/MIA flag.Show us your favorite POW/MIA flag
POW/MIA flags are flying all around the country, and we want to see your favorite POW/MIA flag. Hoping to keep alive the spirit of the POW/MIA flag, we feature a different POW/MIA flag (sometimes more than just one) every issue of our magazine and here on our web site. If you’ve got a camera and can write a short description of why you think it’s important to keep the POW/MIA flags flying, we’d like to hear from you. Lots of people, mostly VietNow members of course, have been sending us pictures of their favorite POW/MIA flags. Some of these flags are flying over the homes of people who care about the issue, and some of the flags fly over other places. Either way, we think it’s important to keep these black-and-white flags flying until our missing brothers are brought back home again. While lots of people want us to forget and pretend everything is OK, we will never forget. Just click to see some of our favorite POW/MIA flags, and to find out how to send us a picture of your favorite POW/MIA flag.

My superheroes were green
Her superheroes didn’t wear capes and tights. They wore Army green.

Vietnam War memorial.Vietnam War memorials
When Michael Walsh decided to start visiting Vietnam War memorials, he had no idea that he was setting out on a a journey of monumental proportions – discovering memorials in every state of the union.

POW/MIA: My POW bracelet
The story of a young girl’s POW bracelet, and a lot more.

PTSD: A marriage odyssey
PTSD can definitely take a toll on a marriage, but this story proves that the situation is not hopeless.

Agent Orange: It’s still here
Did you think Agent Orange just went away? Did you think Agent Orange is just a minor problem? Read the words of these veterans who leave us messages, and you’ll see the truth.

Going on the food run with Jimmy Proffitt
For over twenty years, VietNow member Jimmy Proffitt and his amazing crew have been handing out lunches to the homeless on the cold streets of Chicago.

The chaotic state of the VA
A long-time VA employee talks about some of the big problems at the VA.

Dog tags take the long road home
Dog tags found at the old Khe Sanh battlefield finally get where they’re going.

Kevin Dutton Huey helicopter.The English boy who loves Hueys
Kevin Dutton was only nine years old when he saw his first Huey, but for him it was love at first sight.

The 29th Annual VietNow Convention: Reflections in the photographer’s eye
What the VietNow National Photographer saw there, what he did there, who he shot there, and what he thought about it all.

The good – the bad – the indifferent for veterans incarcerated
While people congratulate and thank veterans for their service, veterans incarcerated get none of this recognition.

Thinking about rightsizing
Thinking about downsizing, rightsizing, or just moving to a smaller place – it’s something many of us are thinking about.

Rolling Thunder, The Wall, and the wonder of it all
Twenty-five years after her brother had been shot down over North Vietnam, a woman and her family get together for a family reunion, and meet up with Rolling Thunder.

Going home
A wife decides to move to Canada with her husband during the war.

Death of a soldier: A child’s viewpoint
She was just a little girl when her uncle went off to Vietnam – and just before he left, he told her a secret that she has kept until right now.

Spring of ’70
All hell broke loose in Iowa City after the National Guard killed four students at Kent State University.

PTSD: Retirement, rest, and renewal
As retirement becomes a reality for many Vietnam 
veterans it’s time to reflect and make good changes.

Vietnam: Personal reflections
War stories that show you didn’t have to be in the infantry to be in the war.

A newbie’s perspective on the VietNow National Convention
After several years of writing for the VietNow National Magazine, a woman walks into the National Convention as a total newbie.

Agent Orange and other veteran health problems
Many Vietnam veterans have suffered for years with service-related health problems, and more are being diagnosed every day. Learn more by reading the stories and articles on our veterans health page.

Joining Forces
Nursing students are Marian University are training to work with veterans.

VA hospital aviary re-dedicated
The Berwyn/Cicero VietNow chapter re-dedicates the aviary they donated over twenty years ago.

Missing in action but not forever
The American military’s commitment to “leave no man behind” is unmatched in the world. The recovery effort is led by JPAC.

ptsdalzheimersPTSD linked to dementia in later life
A new study found that veterans diagnosed with PTSD were nearly twice as likely as other veterans to develop Alzheimer’s disease or dementia as they age.

The rocket stopper
Yes, it’s possible to have a funny war story.

Writing: A pathway for healing trauma
Words can help heal. If you’re suffering from PTSD, why not give “expressive writing” a try?

The good bugs are still dying
Agent Orange: Still one of the most ruthless equal-opportunity killers ever.

SDIT Vietnam trip: Ten-year retrospective
It’s been ten years since the “Sons and Daughters” of SDIT made the trip to Vietnam to visit the places where their fathers died.

Major John F. O'GradyThe search for my father
Patty O’Grady was 14 years old when her father was shot down over North Vietnam. This is the story of her long and frustrating search to find out what really happened, and to bring her father’s remains back home.
Part One
Part Two

Now she knows
VietNow’s POW/MIA Moms waited a long time. How many others will have to wait for the truth?

Vet2Vet: Are you sure it’s PTSD?
News and various thoughts about the VA and other veterans issues.

Vet2Vet: The stress of military life doesn’t ‘just end’ when you get out
News and interesting thoughts about the VA and other veterans issues.

What happened?
Those who have married Vietnam veterans, or veterans of other wars, may find that their relationships change over the years. And not always for the better. Our PTSD expert, Mary Tendall, provides some insights.

In search of an old friend
A young woman and her father go to a cemetery to find an old friend of the father.

Man going to heavenPTSD: Will I go to heaven?
It’s a question many have asked when they’ve looked back on their lives and thought about things they’ve done. But for those who have participated in a war, the question takes on a special significance.

The Memorial Day parade
If there was any way for that massive American flag to be in the parade, Julie was going to find it.

How far back does the POW/MIA issue go?
It’s an old problem, probably dating back to the first wars of prehistoric times.

POW/MIA: Holding on to hope
Dorothy Boyer has supported the POW/MIA movement for decades now, hoping her son may still be alive.

The lost
What do you think about veterans incarcerated? Do you wonder what happened to them? Do you think of them at all?

PTSD: It’s 2013. Did you think you would make it?
One of our favorite writers, a licensed psychotherapist specializing in PTSD, returns to remind us of how far we’ve come, and to encourage us to keep it going.

Veteran benefit buyout plans and other bad ideas
Is someone offering you quick cash in exchange for your benefits? Beware.

Pineapple Avenue
VietNow and VOA helping homeless veterans.

Code Red
A VietNow chaplain remembers a sad incident from his days in basic training.

Your VA appeal
If your VA claim is denied, don’t give up. Although the appeals process can be a long road, filled with piles of paperwork and delays, it’s nowhere near impossible – and our VA claims expert gives these clues for how to do it.

A flag, a remembrance, and a reunion
A sighting of a POW/MIA flag leads to a reunion of old friends.

POWMIA Flag.Show us your favorite POW/MIA flag
POW/MIA flags are flying all around the country, and we want to see your favorite POW/MIA flag. Hoping to keep alive the spirit of the POW/MIA flag, we feature a different POW/MIA flag (sometimes more than just one) every issue of our magazine and here on our web site. If you’ve got a camera and can write a short description of why you think it’s important to keep the POW/MIA flags flying, we’d like to hear from you. Lots of people, mostly VietNow members of course, have been sending us pictures of their favorite POW/MIA flags. Some of these flags are flying over the homes of people who care about the issue, and some of the flags fly over other places. Either way, we think it’s important to keep these black-and-white flags flying until our missing brothers are brought back home again. While lots of people want us to forget and pretend everything is OK, we will never forget. Just click to see some of our favorite POW/MIA flags, and to find out how to send us a picture of your favorite POW/MIA flag.